Water Ways | Staten Island Museum Spring Gala

Super Science Saturdays: Measuring Weather

ARTIST TALK: Nancy Bonior, Peter Van Dyck, and Andy Lenaghan

Bird and Nature Walk: Clove Lakes Park

Bird and Nature Walk: South Beach/Fort Wadsworth

HISTORY TALK: Revolutionary Staten Island

Book Talk and Signing: The Castle Cross the Magnet Carter with Kia Corthron

Shared Museum Member Weekend

Super Science Saturdays: Be a Scientist

Winter Break Gallery Tour: Return of the Mastodon

Winter Break Gallery Tour: Staten Island SEEN

Family Friendly Bird and Nature Walk: Mount Loretto Unique Area

Winter Break Gallery Tour: Opening the Treasure Box

ARTIST TALK: Sarah Yuster’s Native Soil

SCIENCE TALK: Freshkills Restoration of a Habitat

Debut Book Talk & Signing: A Walk Through Moravian Cemetery By Richard Simpson

Bird and Nature Walk: Wolfe’s Pond Park/Lemon Creek

Bird and Nature Walk: Conference House Park

Super Science Saturday: Water, Water, Everywhere

ART TOUR: A New Year of Staten Island SEEN

Spring Gala 2016

Spring Gala 2016


SAV E  T H E  D AT E  •  S P R I N G  G A L A

WATER WAYS

FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2016

HONORING
Ingrid Michaelson
Deputy Borough President, Edward Burke
Northfield Bank Foundation

STATEN ISLAND MUSEUM AT SNUG HARBOR
1000 Richmond Terrace, Staten Island, NY 10301

Save the date for cocktails, dinner, live music, and dancing.

For sponsorship information and journal page sponsorships, contact Samantha Floyd at 718.483.7137.

FORMAL INVITATION TO FOLLOW

CO-CHAIRED BY
Dr. Bonnie Fritz
Janice Giacalone-Stoffers
Gustavo Galvan

Event Location:

Image above: Candles (Bayonne Bridge at Night) • Bill Higgins, American, b. 1948
B&W photographic print, 16 x 20 inches, ca. 1980
Museum purchase • A1988.5.1 • Photo credit: Vinnie Amessé

Bird and Nature Walk: Great Kills Park

Bird and Nature Walk: Clove Lakes Park

Ice-Age Diorama Workshop

$9.99 with Dave Evans

Christmas Bird Count

Super Science Saturdays: Magnetism

Bird and Nature Walk: Great Kills Park

Kaleidoscopic Porcelain

Kaleidoscopic Porcelain

Kaleidoscopic Porcelain from the Edith & Alfred Susskind Porcelain Collection

Kaleidoscopic Porcelain from the Edith & Alfred Susskind Porcelain Collection is a cornucopia of delightfully patterned porcelain plates and cups that recalls a woman who loved life and made it her business to add panache to everything she did. Portions of the recent gift of the Alfred & Edith Susskind Porcelain Collection will be on exhibition in tandem with the Betty Bressi Retrospective exhibition.

Also on view will be “Affinities,” works from the Museum Collection that relate to Ms. Bressi’s art, including creations by Charles Hinman, Milton Glaser, Utagawa Hiroshige, Victor Vasarely, William Blake, Arthur Wesley Dow, a Tlingit Basket, and others, assembled by the Museum’s Curator of Art, Robert Bunkin.

About Edith and Alfred Susskind

Native Staten Islander Edith Susskind was known to most as a gift specialist, boa-wearing business woman, and benefactor for education and culture, but she was also an avid collector of decorative arts. In 1943 Alfred and Edith married and shared their lives and love of early porcelain and fine antiques until his death in 1996. Mr. Susskind’s wedding-anniversary gift to his bride was her original retail shop on Elizabeth Street, around the corner from her famed Forest Avenue location.

Mrs. Susskind was a 1987 Advance Woman of Achievement winner and a Soroptimist International Woman of Distinction. She was presented with the Louis R. Miller Business Leadership Award and was inducted into the Curtis High School Alumni Hall of Fame.  She was also named a Woman of Valor by the UJA Federation.

Mrs. Susskind taught marketing and retailing courses, as well as a course on antiques at the College of Staten Island. She sponsored scholarship community service awards each year at PS 45, West Brighton, her alma mater, and at PS 52, Dongan Hills.

The Civil War Pinhole Project

The Civil War Pinhole Project

The Civil War Pinhole Project - Photographs by Michael Falco

Falco’s commitment to American stories and passion for Civil War history led him on a four-year battlefield to battlefield journey along the anniversary tracks of the American Civil War- 150 years later. The project, which began in 2011, has been recognized by the Library of Congress and accepted into the National Archive.

Falco is, admittedly, a Yankee from Staten Island, but his boyhood fascination with the Civil War and his skill as a creative photographer have come together to capture  a unique view of the past. This project connects historic landscapes, the large format pinhole camera process, and the descendants who painstakingly commemorate the battles of their ancestors. The issues of time, place, war, and perhaps the largest and most elaborate generational “performance art” activities in the country are captured on the historic Civil War Battlefields.  Following the timeline of the “War Between the States” the images culminate in a grand poetic commemoration of the Civil War Sesquicentennial.


“It’s been an arduous and exhilarating trek across landscapes that remain, preserved by virtue of their terrible history, very much as they were 150 years ago—oases now from modernity, pristine and scarred as the great war left them, hallowed and haunting. The past is present on these battlefields,” Falco explains.

The loss of life and destruction during the Civil War was marked by these battles, generally near small towns with abundant fields. In Falco’s four-year travels he traversed the hallowed grounds of Shiloh in Tennessee, Antietum in Maryland, Vicksburg in Mississippi, Gettysburg in Pennsylvania, and Manassa, Chancellorsville and the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. The blood spilled on these battlefields into the grass, knolls, and creeks sets them apart from modern development of the last century and a half.

What began as a strictly landscape project evolved once Falco had the chance to meet and photograph some of the reenactors, many of whom were walking in the footsteps of their great, great grandfathers’, both Union and Confederate.  Some even sporting original family uniforms.

“Their uniforms brought a cohesion to the image …rendering them as ‘every soldier.’  This image also introduced period characters into the 19th century landscape I was marveling at…Standing on the sidelines with the pinhole cameras watching and photographing thousands of reenactors as they participated in this event was a revelation,” said Falco.  “Seeing the war from the ‘soldier’s perspective’ began to fascinate me.”

Leaning as he went, Falco eventually opted to don the period garb.

Time through a Pinhole

Falco’s choice to shoot each image with a pinhole camera is significant. His set of seven wooden boxes, in various sizes and f-stops, were mostly designed by his brother Henry. Compared to modern cameras the pin-hole variety is a non-machine without a lens, viewfinder, or mechanics. Primitive even at the time of the Civil War, the pin-hole camera requires a tripod to achieve sharp focus, patience and a careful composing, and a little bit of luck.

There is no photoshopping or retouching. Disposed towards modesty, Falco shares, “I use my instincts and pray.” What the artist senses, the pinhole sees. The camera’s tiny, fixed aperture creates a soft, infinite focal plane—a canvas where details are obscured. The minuscule amount of light entering the camera requires a long exposure time that pushes the images into the ambiguous terrain between landscape and dreamscape. And so too, Falco’s research into the Civil War soldiers’ journals and memoirs describe the battlefields as dreamlike, and that is how they appear through the eye of the pinhole camera.

About Michael Falco

Michael Falco is a freelance photographer who has worked for a number of publications including, the National Geographic, The New York Times, Harper’s Bazaar, and W Magazines.

His first book, “Along Martin Luther King Travels on Black America’s Main Street”, published by Random House in 2003, is a collection of photographs spanning two years documenting life along streets named after Dr. Martin Luther Kind in America.

The Museum of Modern Art purchased one of his panoramic images of the Fresh Kills Landfill for its exhibit, “Groundswell: Constructing the Contemporary Landscape” 2005.

Selected by the New York City Art Commission he installed a 10 x 28 foot glass mural for the newly renovated Staten Island Ferry Terminal in September 2007.

In 2009, published, “Caddell Dry Dock: 100 Years Harborside”, museum press, a chronicle of one of the last remaining ship repair yards in New York Harbor. An exhibit of the same name was mounted at the Noble Maritime Collection. His photographs are also in the collection of the Staten Island Museum, where his work was integral to the 2007 exhibition, “This Was Our Paradise, Spanish Camp: 1929 – Today”.

Visit FalcoPhoto.com for more.

From Farm to City

From Farm to City

From Farm to City: A Richmond County Savings Foundation Legacy Exhibition

NOTE: In 2012 From Farm to City: Staten Island 1661-2012 was created by the Museum of the City of New York. That exhibition focused on land use – Farmland/Suburb/Retreat/City. The Staten Island Museum’s new legacy version focuses on the people and themes that define the Island’s history and contributions to the nation, using primary sources.

From Farm to City offer a glimpse into Staten Island’s unique history, its people, and the themes that resonate as collective truths on this island using images and historic documents, audio interviews, and digital collections. Staten Island history is rife with surprising facts, unusual characters, and deep-seated American paradoxes, and this exhibition strives to reunite Islanders with their past and share the evolving story of New York City’s “Borough of Parks” with visitors. From Farm to City is also a taste of what you can find in the Museum’s archive and other historical collections.

The Museum’s history and exhibition team, graphic designer Tina Sher, and audio producer David Tarnow developed a dramatic collage that will present the rich history of an often “forgotten” borough. Audio stops will feature community members and historians, and iPads will allow deeper study of documents from various archives. Video newsreels, compiled by the Museum of the City of New York, make 20th century Staten Island come alive as well.

The exhibition will illustrate the Island’s past from the first native inhabitants until the creation of Freshkills Park. Stories will include: Lenape Indian summer encampments, Revolutionary War raids, Civil War draft riots, and peaceful retreats for philosophers, wealthy city folks, and hard-working immigrants. Aging sailors, orphans, and the poor found refuge on Staten Island. African Americans founded a historic free community, and 19thcentury entrepreneurs created bustling factory towns. It will also explore moments of national significance, including the discovery of the cure for tuberculosis and the first tennis tournament in the United States.

By the mid 20thcentury, when Staten Island became the site of world’s longest suspension bridge and its largest landfill, much of its history was overlooked or forgotten. Those who delve into the exhibit will find undiscovered stories to collect, compare, and consider.

Opening the Treasure Box

Opening the Treasure Box

The world comes to Staten Island via people and objects. The Staten Island Museum’s Opening the Treasure Box exhibition will present an array of art works, exploring their stories, collectors, techniques, differences, and similarities.

The Treasure Box gallery displays art objects from five continents: Africa, Asia, Europe, North, and South America. Countries represented include China, Egypt, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, Liberia, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, and the United States. The oldest piece is an Egyptian funerary statuette of a striding man, dating from the second millennium BCE. Other works include an ancient Roman marble portrait head, a sculpture of the dancing Hindu god Ganesh, an intricately embroidered dragon robe from Imperial China, an elaborate Kuba Bwoom mask from the Congo, and extraordinary beaded moccasins made by Lakota Sioux women.

Because these objects from far-flung places are gathered here, you can see in one place what people everywhere share: Similar concerns regarding the desire for beauty and expressions of their religions, celebrations, conflicts, and burial practices, among other issues. While there will be a lot to absorb, this selection of objects will delight your eyes and your mind.

The Staten Island Museum was founded in 1881 by a group of civic-minded naturalists. After D. Wallace MacDonald donated his parents’ collection of antiquities in 1912, the museum began collecting more works of art, including ancient Egyptian and Greek objects. Since then, the collection has been enriched by art of different eras from all over the world.

Remember the Mastodon

Remember the Mastodon

What happened to the Mastodons of Staten Island?

The jumbo molar and other fossilized bones of Mammut americanum found on Staten Island tells us that these giants once called the borough home. Finds like these were wondrous for the people of the 18th and 19th centuries. Today too, it is incredible to imagine 10,000 pound beasts roaming the boroughs of New York City. Their presence on Staten Island serves as a dramatic lesson about extinction and habitat change.
The Museum’s giant tooth indicates that huge megafauna existed on Staten Island 2.6 million to 11,700 years ago, but were lost by the end of the Pleistocene epoch (Ice Age). Why these creatures disappeared is a highly debated question. Scientists have attributed their extinction to hunting, climate change, and even viruses. While all these factors may have played a part, new research on East Coast mastodons indicate climate change was the main culprit; a cautioning message. If we learn why Mastodon disappeared we could be a step closer to understanding our own future and challenges.

Remember the Mastodon is about the hard facts of extinction, the wonder of enduring species, the importance of biodiversity, and the challenge of preservation. It uses the Museum’s 150-plus year collection of flora, fauna, and fossils to show what survival and loss are about.

Sections include:

Fossils Tell a Story (evidence of past life in dinosaur footprints); Mastodons & Humans (Paleo-Indian projectile points and mastodon tooth fossils); Survivors (fossils of coral, horseshoe crabs, dragonflies, shrimp, and other ancient organisms that have close relatives existing today); Birds & Extinction (lost birds like the passenger pigeon, Carolina parakeet, and ivory-billed woodpeckers, are  coupled with currently at-risk and saved species); Collecting & Preserving Biodiversity (the Museum’s 19th century  founders strove to collect and document the biodiversity of Staten Island; this scientific work continues today), and The Mastodon (a full-size replica coming through the Museum wall!).

We can learn about the natural world by studying fossils, collecting specimens to study interconnections and mark local changes, and taking action to protect species and prevent habitat loss. Understanding, preserving, and protecting our environment is a fundamental responsibility for us all.

Create your own user feedback survey

 

 

Art Talk: Amer Kobaslija | Catastrophic Landscape

Earth Camp Gallery

Holidays at Snug Harbor

Bird and Nature Walk: Wolfe’s Pond Park

Fall History Talk: Robert Moses | Master Builder

Floating Ferry Pen

Staten Island Ferry Ornament

Vintage Coaster Set

Staten Island Museum Mug

Staten Island Museum String Bag

Staten Island Museum Umbrella

Arch Homage Silk Scarf

Silk Scarf, Looking Oceanward from Todt Hill, Jasper Cropsey

Neighborhood Tshirt

Cicada Tie

Mastodon

Staten Island Baseball Hat

Merchandise

Merchandise

 Call 718.727.1135 for assistance or to order by phone.
 
Staten Island Hat

Staten Island Baseball Hat
$20.

 

 

 

 

   

 

Neighborhood tshirt

Staten Island Neighborhoods Tshirt
$15.

Sizes
 
 
Cicada Tie

Cicada Tie
$40.
Yellow, silk tie with cicada design.
*Staten Island Museum signature item.

 
 
Silk Scarf

Silk Scarf, Looking Oceanward from Todt Hill, Jasper Cropsey
$35.
Silk scarf featuring 1895 seascape by Jasper Cropsey.
*Staten Island Museum signature item.

 
 
Arch Homage Silk Scarf

Arch Homage Silk Scarf
Inspired by Helen Levin's abstract painting, Arch-Homage VII.
$45.00

 
 
Staten Island Museum String Bag

Staten Island Museum String Bag
Light weight string bag. Available in light blue and neon green (not pictured). (15"x17.5")
$5.00

Color

 

 

 
Mastodon

Plush Mastodon
$20 large, $12 small
Mammut Americanum (the American Mastodon).  Available in two sizes:  12", 7"

Sizes
 
 
 
Staten Island Museum Mug

Staten Island Museum Mug
$10.

 

 

 

 
Vintage Coaster Set

Vintage Coaster Set
Set of 6 (3 images), 3" x 3"
$6.

 

 

 
Staten Island Museum Umbrella

Staten Island Museum Umbrella
Compact umbrella with cover, a Joseph Abboud product.
*Staten Island Museum signature item.
$25.00

 
 
Staten Island Ferry Ornament

Staten Island Ferry Ornament, Molinari Class, (4" x 1.75")
$10.00

 

 

 
Staten Island Ferry Pen

Floating Ferry Pen
$6.

 

 

 

Additional merchandise.

Super Science Saturday: Geo Wonders

Skywalkers: The Legacy of the Mohawk Ironworker at the World Trade Center

The Museum Guild Presents: History and Popular Culture of the Roaring ‘20s

Artist’s Panel: Sense of Place - Followed by Staten Island SEEN Exhibition Reception

History & Pop Culture of the Roaring ‘20s

Staten Island SEEN

Staten Island SEEN

Staten Island SEEN

Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor, 1000 Richmond Terrace
The Staten Island Foundation Gallery 1, South and Gallery 2, North

Staten Island SEEN traces this borough’s unique history and changing landscape from the 17th century to the present. These works are made in a broad range of styles and materials, from ink drawing to anaglyph 3-D video. In the past, artists were attracted to Staten Island for its varied landscape: The shoreline, inland hills, ponds, valleys, waterways, and forests all provided inspiration. Contemporary artists depict these natural features as well as the way we live today, including parking lots, strip malls, tract houses, and other aspects of our suburban landscape.

In this exhibit you will see artists’ responses to the changes that have occurred to Staten Island’s landscape since 1928, including the construction of the commuter bridges (Bayonne, Goethals, Outerbridge, and Verrazano-Narrows), urban-style high-rise housing, tract housing, new communities, and shopping centers.

Some of these developments have occurred in floodplain communities – many established as summer vacation retreats decades ago – that were severely damaged or destroyed by Superstorm Sandy in 2012.

Staten Island is the most rural New York City borough, where you can hike for miles within dense woods, explore wetlands, and climb steep terrain, yet be only a bus and ferry ride away from Manhattan’s skyscrapers. These natural aspects are part of what has made Staten Island so attractive to new residents, and led to its rapid development. But while the population density has greatly increased, more than one-third of the island is protected parkland, including the Greenbelt and more than 170 parks. Beaches, wetlands, hills, and little-known places of tranquility are adjacent to bustling commercial strips and residential communities.

Staten Island continues a balancing act between the urban and rural aspects of its character; this contrast is explored in Staten Island SEEN.

Learn more about Staten Island SEEN here.

Featured Artists: 

Living Artists - Marylou & Jerome Bongiorno, Nancy Bonior, Brian Brooks, Paul Caranicas, Rackstraw Downes, Nicholas Evans-Cato, Richard Estes, Ned Gannon, Diana Horowitz, Amer Kobaslija, Andrew Lenaghan, Ginger Levant, Stanley Lewis, Cynthia Mailman, Ron Milewicz, Bill Murphy, Lenora Paglia, Stephanie Pierce, Morgan Taylor, Peter Van Dyck, and Sarah Yuster.

G. W. Barrows, William Henry Bartlett, Ely M. Behar, Cecil Crosley Bell, Louis George Bouché, John Bradley, Ferdinand Busing, James Edward Buttersworth, Alfred DeGiorgio Crimi, Jasper Francis Cropsey, Jasper Dankaerts, Mauritz Frederik De Haas, Mabel Dwight, Johan Peter Eggers, Hermann Feuchsel, Victor Joseph Gatto, Frederick Kost, Percy Leason, William Rickarby Miller, Edward Moran, John A. Noble, Archibald Robertson, Charles Schabelitz, Henry Ernest Schnakenberg, John French Sloan, Anthony Toney, Norman Turner, Robert Wallis, Otto Charles Wigand, C. Winter.

STATEN ISLAND MUSEUM EXHIBITION TEAM
Elizabeth Egbert, Robert Bunkin, Donna Pagano, Diane Matyas, Audrey Malachowsky, Claire Aniela Arthurs

CONSULTANTS
Barnett Shepherd

EXHIBITION PLANNING AND DESIGN
Staten Island Museum

LIGHTING DESIGN
Technical Artistry, New York, New York

EXHIBITION FABRICATION
1220 Exhibits, Inc. Nashville, Tennessee

CONSER VATORS
Rhonda Feinman Custom Frames, Inc. Woodside, New York
Reiger Art Conservation, LLC, New York, New York
Sherman Art Conservation, Sea Cliff, New York

AUDIO PRODUCER
David Tarnow, Toronto, Ontario Canada

History Center Gallery

History Center Gallery

Currently On View


  • Mokawks_Geggs_by Melissa Cacciola

    Skywalkers: The Legacy of the Mohawk Ironworker at the World Trade Center | Contemporary Tintypes by Melissa Cacciola

    November 21, 2015 - February 22, 2016

    A collection of contemporary tintype portraits of Mohawk Ironworkers who volunteered in the rescue efforts after 9/11 and were an integral part of the construction of One World Trade, Towers 2, 3, and 4 and the Calatrava Transportation Hub.

    Read about the exhibit in the Staten Island Advance.

    Location: Staten Island Museum History Center, Building H, Snug Harbor Campus, 1000 Richmond Terrace, SI, NY 10301

 

The Museum in St. George

The Museum in St. George

Currently On View

  • Pinhole Civil War by Michael Falco

    The Civil War Pinhole Project
    Photographs by Michael Falco

    April 25, 2015 - April 17, 2016
    Free with Museum Admission

    This exhibition presents a selection of prints made by photographer Michael Falco.  Falco’s commitment to American stories and passion for Civil War history led him on a four year battlefield-to-battlefield journey along the anniversary tracks of the American Civil War- 150 years later.  The project, which began in 2011, has been recognized by the Library of Congress and has been accepted into the National Archive. 
    Learn more about the Civil War Pinhole Project and photographer Michael Falco.

    Location: Staten Island Museum, St. George, 75 Stuyvesant Place

    This exhibition has been made possible, in part, through support from NYC Departement of Cultural Affairs, New York State Council on the Arts, Victory State Bank, and Con Edison.

 

 

  • Hall of Natural Science

    The museum presents our own cabinet of curiosities and collected wonders of nature, including selections of our best: stuffed birds, eggs, mammals, shells, fossils, plant specimens, amphibians and more things in jars!

    Featuring: Fluorescent Mineral Room

     
  • Lenape: The First Staten Islanders

    Lenape: The First Staten Islanders

    A classic favorite returned to the Museum! Come and see artifacts from the Museum's renowned Lenape Collection with pieces that date back to the Paleo-Indians of more than 10,000 years ago.

     
  • Wall of Insects

    Wall of Insects

    Fascinating butterflies, cicadas, and beetles from the permanent collection burst with colors and different shapes.

    Sponsored by Time Warner Cable

     
  • Staten Island Ferry:
    The First 100 Years of Municipal Service

    Coinciding with the Ferry's Centennial Anniversary in 2005, the Staten Island Museum opened a new permanent exhibition celebrating one of NYCs best-loved icons, the Staten Island Ferry.

 

  • The Love Motel for Insects: MAGICICADA Staten Island Variation  by Brandon Ballengée

    The Love Motel for Insects: MAGICICADA Staten Island Variation

    Now on view

    Magicicada is a site specific light sculpture in the shape of a huge cicada. Award winning eco-artist, Brandon Ballengée's latest art work's glow attracts both insects and humans who are then able to view the strange but beautiful world of insects. Expect to spend summer nights in the courtyard of the Museum. Click here for more information from the artist. 

    Location: Staten Island Museum Courtyard, 75 Stuyvesant Place, SI, NY 10301

    Supported in part by 

    Deutsche Bank Logo

     

 

 

 

Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor

Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor

Currently On View


  • Remember the Mastodon

    Remember the Mastodon: Diversity & Preservation
    A Richmond County Savings Foundation Exhibition
    with additional funding f
    rom the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

    Remember the Mastodon is about the hard facts of extinction, the wonder of enduring species, the importance of bio-diversity and the challenge of preservation. Includes fossils, lost bird species, and a full-size replica of a Mastodon emerging through the wall! Visit the Museum opening weekend to help name the newest addition to the Museum team! 

    Read about Remember the Mastodon in the New York Times.

    Location: Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor, Building A, 1000 Richmond Terrace, SINY 10301

 

  • Staten Island SEEN 

    Staten Island SEEN and Staten Island SEEN: Witnessing Change

    The exhibition traces this borough’s unique history and landscape from the 17th century to the present. These works are made by amateur and professional artists, working in a broad range of styles and materials from ink drawing to anaglyph 3-D video. Artists include the masters of the Hudson River School such as Edward Moran and Jasper Cropsey, a native Staten Islander, Cecil C. Bell, who lived on Staten Island and current talents like Sara Yuster and Bill Murphy.

    Location: Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor, Building A, 1000 Richmond Terrace, SINY 10301

 

  • Opening the Treasure Box 

    Opening the Treasure Box: Bringing the World Home

    Presenting art objects spanning 4,000 years of artistic endeavor gathered from five continents: Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America. Countries represented include Germany, Greece, India, Japan, Liberia, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, and the United States. The oldest piece is an Egyptian funerary statuette of a striding man, dating from 2,000 BCE.

    Location: Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor, Building A, 1000 Richmond Terrace, SINY 10301

 

  • From Farm to City

    From Farm to City
    A Richmond County Savings Foundation Legacy Exhibition

    A glimpse into Staten Island’s unique history, its people, and the themes that resonate as collective truths on this unusual island using images and historic documents, audio interviews, and digital collections. This exhibition strives to reunite Islanders with their past and share the evolving story of New York City’s Borough of Parks with visitors. From Farm to City: Staten Island 1661-2012 was created by the Museum of the City of New York. The exhibition focused on land-use on Staten Island. This legacy exhibition focuses on the people and themes that define the Island throughout history.

    Location: Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor, Building A, 1000 Richmond Terrace, SINY 10301

 

Main Exhibition Sponsors:

 

The Museum at Snug Harbor

The Museum at Snug Harbor

Currently On View


 

  • Staten Island SEEN 

    Staten Island SEEN

    The exhibition traces this borough’s unique history and landscape from the 17th century to the present. These works are made by amateur and professional artists, working in a broad range of styles and materials from ink drawing to anaglyph 3-D video. Artists include the masters of the Hudson River School such as Edward Moran and Jasper Cropsey, a native Staten Islander, Cecil C. Bell, who lived on Staten Island and current talents like Sara Yuster and Bill Murphy.

    Location: Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor, Building A, 1000 Richmond Terrace, SINY 10301

 

 

 

Main Exhibition Sponsors:

 

Bird and Nature Walk: Conference House Park

Fall Science Talk: Mastodon & Ice Age Mammals

Name the Mastodon

Name the Mastodon

 

Create your own user feedback survey

 

Remember the Mastodon (A Richmond County Savings Foundation Exhibition) is about the hard facts of extinction, the wonder of enduring species, the importance of bio-diversity and the challenge of preservation. Includes fossils, lost bird species, and a full-size replica of a Mastodon emerging through the wall!

Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor, Building A, 1000 Richmond Terrace, SINY 10301 (Map)

Con Edison STEM Days Out

Con Edison STEM Days Out

The Museum was awarded $25,000 from Con Edison to conduct seven STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) lessons for middle school youth. STEM Days Out are presented by the Staten Island Museum’s education and science staff and held the first Wednesday of the month, from October 2015 through May 2016 at the Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor (1000 Richmond Terrace, Building A).

The Museum will collaborate with Staten Island MakerSpace where participants will tour their new mobile STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) Wagon in addition, students will receive hands-on, interdisciplinary lessons that integrates humanities and the arts. The Museum is currently taking reservations and teachers can sign up their classes by contacting the Museum’s Education Department at 718.483.7103 or email LLonecke@StatenIslandMuseum.org

Upcoming programs include:

• November 4, 2015: Simple and Complex Machines
• December 2, 2015: Be a Scientist!
• February 3, 2016 STEAM Wagon with Staten Island MakerSpace and Metal Embossing
• March 2, 2016: STEAM Wagon with Staten Island MakerSpace and Doodle ‘Bots
• April 6, 2016: STEAM Wagon with Staten Island MakerSpace and Bottle Rockets
• May 4, 2016: STEAM Wagon with Staten Island MakerSpace and LittleBit

“Students will see and touch exhibits that they don’t have in their classrooms,” said Hilary Ayala, Con Edison director of Strategic Partnerships. “This is a chance for us to support teachers and students in our local schools.”

“We are so pleased to have the opportunity to provide STEM programming to local schools through the support of Con Edison,” said the Museum’s Manager of Education Christine Szeluga. “By providing STEM education for students, especially for middle school youth, Con Edison STEM Days Out will spark a great interest in science, technology, engineering and math and offer opportunities students may not have otherwise had.”

Con Edison provides more than $10 million in financial and in-kind contributions to students and nonprofits in New York City and Westchester that enhance STEM education. Funding includes support for scholarships to students majoring in STEM fields, as well as program support for summer internships and year-round programs benefitting underprivileged and minority students.

 

 

Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor, 1000 Richmond Terrace, Building A
Staten Island, NY 10301

Header and Footer Elements

Bird and Nature Walk: Moses Mountain

Open House NY

Super Science Saturday: Remember the Mastodon

Educator OPEN HOUSE

Archtober: Building of the Day Tour

Bird and Nature Walk: Mt. Loretto Unique Area

65th Annual Fence Show

Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor

Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor

 

Now Open!

After 4 years of construction, the $24.4 million City-funded renovation of a landmarked facility on the Snug Harbor Cultural Center Campus, a Historic District on the National Registry opened to the public on Saturday, September 19, 2015 and welcomed over 3,000 people during the opening weekend festivities. New York City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, New York City Department of Design and Construction Commissioner Feniosky Peña-Mora, Staten Island Deputy Borough President Edward Burke, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs Deputy Commissioner Tracey Knuckles, New York State Assemblyman Michael Cusick, Councilmember Debi Rose, and New York State Assemblyman Matthew Titone joined Staten Island Museum Interim President & CEO Cheryl Adolph, Chairman Ralph Branca, and Museum trustees on the steps of the Museum’s new home to cut the ribbon on this watershed moment in New York City history.

The Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor is now open to the public 7 days a week. 

Monday - Friday 11:00AM - 5:00PM
Saturday              10:00AM - 5:00PM
Sunday                12:00PM - 5:00PM

Exhibitions 

  • Remember the Mastodon

    Remember the Mastodon: Diversity & Preservation
    A Richmond County Savings Foundation Exhibition
    with additional funding f
    rom the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

    Remember the Mastodon is about the hard facts of extinction, the wonder of enduring species, the importance of bio-diversity and the challenge of preservation. Includes fossils, lost bird species, and a full-size replica of a Mastodon emerging through the wall!

 

  • Staten Island SEEN 

    Staten Island SEEN and Staten Island SEEN: Witnessing Change

    The exhibition traces this borough’s unique history and landscape from the 17th century to the present. These works are made by amateur and professional artists, working in a broad range of styles and materials from ink drawing to anaglyph 3-D video. Artists include the masters of the Hudson River School such as Edward Moran and Jasper Cropsey, a native Staten Islander, Cecil C. Bell, who lived on Staten Island and current talents like Sara Yuster and Bill Murphy.

 

  • Opening the Treasure Box 

    Opening the Treasure Box: Bringing the World Home

    Presenting art objects spanning 5,000 years of artistic endeavor gathered from five continents: Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America. Countries represented include Germany, Greece, India, Japan, Liberia, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, and the United States.  The oldest piece is an Egyptian funerary statuette of a striding man, dating from 2,000 BCE.

 

  • From Farm to City

    From Farm to City
    A Richmond County Savings Foundation Legacy Exhibition

    A glimpse into Staten Island’s unique history, its people, and the themes that resonate as collective truths on this unusual island using images and historic documents, audio interviews, and digital collections. This exhibition strives to reunite Islanders with their past and share the evolving story of New York City’s Borough of Parks with visitors. From Farm to City: Staten Island 1661-2012 was created by the Museum of the City of New York. The exhibition focused on land-use on Staten Island. This legacy exhibition focuses on the people and themes that define the Island throughout history.

 

Main Exhibition Sponsors:

 

Directions and Parking 

Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor
1000 Richmond Terrace, Staten Island, NY 10301
(on the grounds of Snug Harbor Cultural Center & Botanical Garden in Building A)

Public Transportation:

From the Staten Island Ferry, take the S40 bus along Richmond Terrace for 1.7 miles and exit at Snug Harbor.

By Car from New Jersey:

Take the Staten Island Expressway (Route 278) eastbound. Exit at Clove Road. Stay to the left and make a left at the light onto Clove Road. At Bard Avenue, turn sharp right. Continue on Bard Avenue for approximately 1.5 miles. Turn right onto Delafield Avenue which will turn into Snug Harbor Road. Continue straight on Snug Harbor Road, turn right onto the Snug Harbor Cultural Center Campus. Parking is available on the left. The Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor is located at Building A.

By Car from Brooklyn:

Get on the lower deck of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge. Bear right after tollbooth and take the first exit to Bay Street (follow School Road to light, make left onto Bay Street). Take Bay Street for approximately 2.5 miles where it becomes Richmond Terrace (at the Staten Island Ferry Terminal). Continue onto Richmond Terrace for 1.7 miles, turn left onto Snug Harbor Road and turn left onto the Snug Harbor Campus. Parking is available on the left. The Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor is located at Building A.

Parking: 

Parking on the Snug Harbor campus is free. There is also ample free street parking in the surrounding area.

Design

With renovations designed by Gluckman Mayner Architects and primary exhibitions designed by Ralph Appelbaum Associates, the expanded Museum will provide over 18,000 square feet in usable space, including 4 climate controlled galleries, an auditorium/performance venue, and classroom space for school field trips. The Museum will be the first historical landmark building on Staten Island to earn a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification from the US Green Building Council and meet the stringent environmental standards of the American Museum Association. The new facility will utilize a closed loop geothermal system which uses the earth and a series of circulating pumps to heat and cool the building which will boost efficiency and reduce the operational costs of the building’s heating and cooling systems.

To achieve the necessary climate control a "building within a building" was designed by the team at Gluckman Mayner Architects. The dilapidated interior was completely removed, save one historic staircase, leaving only the original exterior walls. A steel structure was put in place inside of the original “envelope,” thereby creating new walls at the perimeter that gave the building proper thermal and moisture protection. The landmarked windows were kept and an innovative inner glass wall was built at each creating a climate controlled transparent cavity to allow for natural light to flow through the space and the viewing of the original windows from inside the galleries.
The design is modern, edging on minimal with detailing that is respectful and reminiscent of the building’s history.

 

About the Building | History

Originally built in 1879, Building A was one of over 50 structures that comprised Sailors’ Snug Harbor; an 83-acre site founded by Robert Richard Randall as a “haven for aged, decrepit and worn out sailors.” In its day, Sailors’ Snug Harbor was the richest charitable institution in the United States and a self-sustaining community composed of a working farm, dairy, bakery, chapel, sanatorium, hospital, music hall and cemetery. In the mid-20th century, however, the institution experienced serious financial difficulties and declining number of residents which led to many of the once magnificent buildings falling into disrepair and later being demolished. In the 1960s, the Staten Island Museum led the fight to preserve Sailors’ Snug Harbor and ultimately gave up its city allocated funding to help purchase the site and to designate it a New York City landmark.  In the original master plan for the “saved” Snug Harbor site, Buildings A and B were designated as the future home of the Staten Island Museum. The historic Greek Revival building (Building A) will become the nexus of the Museum’s activities and will exemplify the goals of preservation, history and respect for the natural environment that are the core of the Museum’s mission.

Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is Staten Island's premier destination for culture and entertainment. Set within an 83-acre park-like setting, Snug Harbor presents a blend of gardens, museums, theaters, educational opportunities, and seasonal festivals. 

GRAND OPENING: Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor

GRAND OPENING: Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor

Private Preview Opening: Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor

Midweek Bird Walk: Clove Lakes Park

Bumper Crop of Pop-Up Art

An Evening With Things That Flutter, Delight

Museum Quality

SI Museum’s “Fence Show” Turns 64

Have a Nocturnal Moth Ball in the Greenbelt

Going Global

NYers Not Leaving Home

Midweek Bird Walk: Conference House

Summer is the Perfect Time to Explore Some of Staten Island’s Best Kept Secrets

Antiques

Elizabeth Egbert Dies at 69

Hues the Boss? Actually, There Are Two

Celebrating the Life of an Arts Legend

Ingrid Michaelson Helping SI Museum

Typewriters and Poetry Featured at Staten Island Museum’s “Love Fest”

S.I. Museum at Snug Sets Opening Date

Obstacles Ahead for Island Cultural Institutions with Wheel on Horizon

Arts & Entertainment

St. George

Betty Bressi Retrospective

On the Job

New Municipal ID Inspires Brisk Trot, If Not a Stampede